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PMO and Kindergarten Skills

PMO and Kindergarten Skills - Emma-Ruth Arnaz-Pemberton - FuturePMO by Wellingtone

By Emma-Ruth Arnaz-Pemberton

The Wellingtone PMO Principles cite that all PMOs should work towards:

  • Being an instrument of integration
  • Being the single source of truth
  • Serving the Customer
  • Enabling capability
  • Supporting a learning organisation

As I see the industry developing, I often reflect on these five principles to see if they remain to be true and whether the industry continues to be representative of them. This happened some time ago when I listened to a webinar by SEBA Solutions that discussed the skills that Leaders should look for when building or transforming a team.

One of the key points that stuck out for me was the Kindergarten skills test; where team members are scored on the same basis as young children early on in their education. On the surface of it, it sounds implausible but when you look deeper you can see the correlation!

In a world where technology allows those with motive to mask bad behaviour through faceless use of pointed information, and effectively shrugging off any responsibility for that behaviour, individuals should take an opportunity to regularly take stock of the skills they have been learning since childhood rather than focusing on how good they are at delivery.

The Hawaiian children are asked to put a Yes or a No next to each statement, which is then reviewed and counter-scored by the teacher, encouraging Emotional Intelligence early on in life. Emotional Intelligence is an important part of the Wellingtone PMO Competence Framework which is reflected in the Kindergarten test. How will you do?

Emotional Intelligence - PMO Competence Framework - Kindergarten Test

 

Remember when dealing with others that Marshall Goldsmith who wrote the book Mojo, said “…sometimes no matter how positive we feel about what we are doing, we fail at showing it on the outside. We are so focused on completing our task that we assume people can read our hearts and minds. We think our good intentions should be obvious.”